The Lies of Locke Lamora – Scott Lynch (Book Review)

I bought this as, this year, I am trying to explore genres which I have previously avoided. This was suggested as a good fantasy series, and I was interested enough in the premise to give it a go:

The Thorn of Camorr is said to be an unbeatable swordsman, a master thief, a friend to the poor, a ghost that walks through walls.

Slightly built and barely competent with a sword, Locke Lamora is, much to his annoyance, the fabled Thorn. And while Locke does indeed steal from the rich (who else would be worth stealing from?), the oor never see a penny. All of Locke’s gains are strictly for himself and his tight-knit band of thieves: The Gentleman Bastards.

The capricious and colourful underworld of the ancient city of Camorr is the only home they’ve ever known. But now a clandestine war is threatening to tear it apart. Caught up in a mudererous game, Locke and his friends are suddenly struggling to stay alive…

As an introduction into the fantasy genre, I certainly chose a good one! The Lies of Locke Lamora is likely the best book I have read so far in 2017, and I look forward to continuing the series.

The setting is unique too many fantasy books, being set in a single city, where the noblemen live in comfort, whilst the majority either have to steal to survive, or become slaves.

The magic system isn’t too convoluted either – some characters are capable of magic, either for destruction or (more commonly) healing for a price – none of the main protagonists have magic abilities, and so it is very much a scenic fact for the setting.

The writing style is very captivating too, with each chapter ending with an ‘interlude’, flashing-back to The Gentlemen Bastards childhood, as they are apprenticed into becoming master thieves. My hesitancy with fantasy books is that, with their being so many, they are often badly written, and the use of language is either underwhelming, or intentionally overwhelming. Lynch strikes the perfect balance, and the intermingled humour was spot on for the tone of the novel.

The characters are well developed and very unique – not veering down the cliche fantasy-thief types that (I admit) I was half expecting. Each has their own strengths and weaknesses, and feels well thought out during the reading. The story-line kept the motivations and plans of the characters well hidden though, leading to some great reveals as the plot unraveled.

I have already bought the second in the series, and look forward to starting it later in the month!

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