Mort – Terry Pratchett (Book Review)

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The fourth in the Discworld series which I began earlier in the year:

It is known as the Discworld. It is a flat planet, supported on the backs of four elephants, who in turn stand on the back of the great turtle A’Tuin as it swims majestically through space. And it is quite possibly the funniest place in all of creation…

Death comes to us all. When he came to Mort, he offered him a job.

After being assured that being dead was not compulsory, Mort accepted. However, he soon found that romantic longings did not mix easily with the responsibilities of being Death’s apprentice.

The book centers around a young man named Mort who has found that he has little to recommend him in many professions often undertook by people of his age. After unsuccessfully waiting in the market to be offered an apprenticeship, Death arrives at midnight and invites him to work in his unique profession – ushering people into the afterlife.

Mort accepts and begins learning the profession, and exploring much of what lies beyond mortal understanding in the afterlife.

Death, finding himself with some free time, also begins exploring new avenues, and finding himself quite apt at being a chef, begins working in a kitchen in Ankh Morpork

The book contains much of the comedy as the other books but feels a lot more structured, which is a good thing. That being said, the storyline is still very simplistic, and though identifiable, it isn’t particularly captivating.

Another positive though is that the comedy in this book feels a little bit less forced than it does in the previous one: the jokes seem to fit the context a lot better, and often simply wordplay on the situation is employed.

I will continue to read the series, however, finding them a good “light” read in-between other books. They are certainly worth a read for fantasy fans looking for something other than the typical high fantasy doorstop books.

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Equal Rites – Terry Pratchett (Book Review)

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The third in the Discworld series, following on from the other two!

The last thing the wizard Drum Billet did, before Death laid a bony hand on his shoulder, was to pass on his staff of power to the eighth son of an eighth son. Unfortunately for his colleagues in the chauvinistic (not to say misogynistic) world of magic, he failed to check on the new-born baby’s sex…

Terry Pratchett turns his acute satirical eye on sexual equality and chauvanism in his hilarious third Discworld novel.

The story centers around Discworlds first female wizard – witches being something quite different and altogether more sensible.

The story essentially follows Esk throughout her life in the village under the guidance of a witch, picking up magic quickly and beyond even the witches capabilities. She then travels to the Unseen University to attempt entry as the first female wizard.

I think I enjoyed this book a little less than the other two, but it still had it’s funny moments and clever dialogue. Worth a read as an introduction to some characters I am told re-appear in the late books however; which I intend on reading!

I guess the obvious is that this book touches on feminism – that on Discworld, it is only tradition that says wizards have to be male, and that it is not “written anywhere”. I was expecting this to be a bit heavy-handed, but it was handled quite well and in a satirical way which perhaps merit mention.

“Mort” next!

The Light Fantastic – Terry Pratchett (Book Review)

I bought the second in the Discworld series after enjoying the first one. The ease in reading this, and the light-heartedness of the stories, have become something I look forward to between reading more challenging books:

In the sky appears a red star, which gets bigger day-by-day as Great A’Tuin approaches it. The wizards of Discworld begin the search for the 8th Great Spell, which must be said along with the other 7 – only in times of crisis.

The 8th spell, safely within Rincewinds, seems somewhat reluctant to be caught, however.

Joining up with the now old, Cohen the Barbarian, Rincewind and Twoflower traverse Discworld, seeking the answer to save the world from colliding with the great red star.

The story sets place in a variety of environments, from forests, to cities, to inside an ancient spell-book. The characters continued to be developed, and the conclusion of their story-lines something which I’m eager to pursue in the following books in the series.

I did feel, however, that there were one or two lines which should have been cut somewhere in editing. Though perhaps humorous, they just didn’t sit well in the holistic atmosphere of the book.

Though perhaps not quite as enjoyable as the first Discworld novel, the conclusion to evade me until the closing pages – the threat of the approaching star seemingly unavoidable, yet the mixed reactions of the inhabitants of Discworld making it hard to guess who knew what was actually happening – which is not a bad thing.

Reading the Discworld series so far has encouraged me to branch out more in fantasy novels, and that can’t be a bad thing. I looked forward to exploring the genre more this year!

The Colour of Magic – Terry Pratchett (Book Review)

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I bought this book about 2 years ago but never got around to reading it. I bought it after a talk with a friend of mine who has read everything Pratchett ever wrote. I recently gave it a read before starting a bigger book:

Rincewind, a wizard drop-out, becomes the unlikely guide to the Discworld’s first tourist: Twoflower. Travelling on the a Disc-shaped world, supported by 4 large elephants on the back of a giant turtle travelling through space, the characters get into a variety of situations, pursued by the overly-loyal Luggage.

To appreciate the book, a knowledge of fantasy is already required: over-the-top plots, very convenient timings, etc. as the whole book is written as a fantasy-satire. This is introduced early on when, in the case of an attempt to greet another person failing, it is said that the character realises he ‘fumbled the introduction’ – a reference to D&D.

The book follows to characters as the face a variety of challenges, mostly coming about by the eager Twoflowers want to explore and take pictures of the world.

The book is written in a very simple way but, and this was my misunderstanding, in a way which is appropriate for young children (teens perhaps, though). With references to ‘whoring’ and a fair bit of nudity aside, a lot of the humour would require a bit of explanation for children.

The book itself is light-hearted, however, and I enjoyed reading it. I’m likely to read others in the series in time, but not after a heavier read!