Red Seas Under Red Skies – Scott Lynch (Book Review)

After enjoying The Lies of Locke Lamora a lot, I immediately bought the second book in the Gentleman Bastards sequence:

Thief and con-man extraordinaire, Locke Lamora, and the ever lethal Jean Tannen have fled their home city and the wreckage of their lives. But they can’t run forever and when they stop they decide to head for the richest, and most difficult, target on the horizon. The city state of Tal Verarr. And the Sinspire.

The Sinspire is the ultimate gambling house. No-one has stolen so much as a single coin from it and lived. It’s the sort of challenge Locke simply can’t resist…

…but Locke’s perfect crime is going to have to wait.

Someone else in Tal Verarr wants the Gentleman Bastards’ expertise and is quite prepared to kill them to get it. Before long, Locke and Jean find themselves engaged in piracy. Fine work for thieves who don’t know one end of a galley from another.

This book begins 2 years after the events in The Lies of Locke Lamora – with Locke and Jean in a whole new setting, no longer able to live in Camorr safely.

The storyline, much like the first book, is very engaging, and with twists and turns along the way, keeps you guessing as to how Locke and Jean are going to get out of it. With the head of the gambling house, the political nobility, the leader of the navy, and the bonds-magi, Locke and Jean find themselves to be the most wanted men in Tal Verarr, for various purposes.

A lot of this book (as you might have guessed by the cover) takes place on the sea, aboard a ship called the Poison Orchid. Lock and Jean become embroiled in lives of piracy, and the setting of the wide ocean lends to this book a very unique and desired aspect – so few books seem to go for this setting.

With the humour and camaraderie of Jean and Locke, this book has a lot of genuinely funny and heartfelt lines, and the writing, as with the first book, is fantastic. I will be purchasing the third in the series shortly, and then will be up to date!

I enjoyed this book perhaps a little less than the first, but only a little: the first had such a unique debut into fantasy that everything was new and developing. The characters, though developed further in this book, are not to the same degree. The focus narrowing to just two of the Gentlemen Bastards, however, lends to a deeper look into their life and friendship.

Overall, a great second installment, and one I couldn’t put down.

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