The Reader on the 6.27 – Jean-Paul Didierlaurent (Book Review)

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This book is fairly popular at the moment, and I have even heard in anecdotal exchanges that some adults are almost in tears at the impact this book has had on their life.

Guylain, an employee at a book-pulping factory rides the 6.27 train every morning, reading aloud to the other passengers pages from random books that he had pulled out of the pulping machine the day before.

Living a pained existence in a job he hates, feeling like a murder, his best friends are an elderly man who speaks in alexandrines, a disabled ex-colleague obsessed with finding his legs, and his goldfish (replaced when necessary).

Until he finds the diary of a young lady who cleans public toilets for living, and immediately falls in love with this stranger he has yet to meet.

The book itself is perhaps something I wouldn’t usually go for: the feel-good, romantic theme being something which I’d consider often predictable, often repeated, and often unsatisfying. I wouldn’t necessarily say that for this book: it is quite a unique romance in a sense. The girl seems like a very unique character, and was in someways my favourite in the book for her outlook on life.

Though the book was sometimes funny, an easy read, and not at all boring: I still found that I was dissatisfied upon completion: I found Guylain’s idol somewhat annoying and couldn’t quite see his fascination with him. I also found the romance ultimately open-ended with a somewhat ambiguous ending. I guess in someways the couple were both individually quirky, but it seems a bit of a mismatch to me: Guylain always came across a bit too passive.

Not a terrible book by any means, and could easily be read in a matter of a few sittings. Perhaps it’s the ‘feel-good’ factor that will draw many towards it, and it is likely just not my cup-of-tea. Worth a shot if it sounds like your thing, though!

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